Where You Sit Says a Lot, Maybe

Had to laugh when I saw this, reminded me of my uni days, where I sat and the mates that I sat with.

Where Do You Sit?

I would agree for the most part that this is spot on. So where did I sit? Well usually at the back (near a door preferably), but not really because I thought I was cool. My reasons for sitting at the back:

  • I am generally paranoid and don’t like people sitting behind me
  • I was always worried what would happen if there was a fire with 200 people wanting to get out the same door – I wanted to be first
  • Stops me wondering what faces people were pulling
  • I could play handheld Yatzee without being noticed
  • I have a loud voice so when we were talking I was not heard and if I was the chalk, rubber or other projectile missed
  • I knew what was going on in the lecture hall
  • sneaking out was easy (we thought about it and never did – honest)

I used to sit with a good mate Benn (who has zero web presence or I would link to him!). We are still mates to this day. I am sure he would agree with the comic as well. Not sure about why he sat with me (apart from being mates), he probably has different reasons.

As far as the assessment of others, front row and second are spot on. The do-gooders in the front row drove me nuts, the guys in the second were OK but they were trying way too hard! The middle bunch were average and never were at any extreme. Don’t know about the sensitive ones, it obviously worked because I can’t remember! Personally, I know I have always been unique and not really fitting any mold you throw at me. I have resisted conformity and stereo-types and this is demonstration of that attitude. I don’t want to either.

This may well paint me as a bit of a paranoid slacker. But I graduated from university with distinction and a Dean’s Commendation. Not blowing my trumpet but did not want you to think I wasted my educational opportunity.

Thanks to Roger Chen who shared this comic via FeedFriend

Angus’ Ant Trap

My eldest son built this contraption this morning. After a very long explanation I got out of him that it is in fact an ant trap. After it traps them it kills them. I have labeled the image on Flickr in case you want to know what the components are to build your own.

Beware ants, Angus is onto you… I am pleased to see that he not only has a vivid imagination but also some emerging architectural and building skills.

I am scared looking at it. Dunno what the ants think!

Ant Trap

Comment Armageddon

So there I was catching up on some RSS feeds that I had missed over the Christmas New Year break. I made an unexpected find while I was doing that. Michael Arrington’s TechCrunch is a respected authority in Web 2.0 circles as far as covering new start-ups and the culture of the Internet and technology news. But this post caused some controversy.

TechCrunch covered a website that was a social network for budding photographers. So what you might say. Well this is a social network for amateur pornography. I have not linked to the site covered because that is not what this post is about. Arrington covers the site in a very matter-of-fact way that you would expect. It would seem that his readers don’t appreciate it, generally. True this is not the sort of thing that TechCrunch usually covers and that might be why there was the reaction that there was. Still not sure it was worthy of the reaction of some.

The real action here is the comments. There are no less than 191 comments at the time of this post. It is the most entertaining run of comments that I have read in a long time. Like fies to a dead cow everyone turns up for a go. It has everything from name calling to preaching doom and gloom. There are “hissy” fits and passionate pleas. Everything, you name it you will find it here.

What’s more the names read like a who’s who of the blogosphere. Featuring in order of appearance:

I am sure there are some I missed or did not recognise. These guys probably subscribe to TechCrunch so I am not surprised that they do. But for them to be motivated enough to comment, you can imagine. I learned some things about Robert Scoble that I did not know. He actually kicks butt in an argument. Still not sure why they got involved, no one wins a flame war.

Very entertaining and well worth the read. Not often I recommend to skip the article and go straight to the comments. I am not about to make judgements about the merits of Arringtons choice of topics but suffice to say his readers have spoken. But from my perspective it doesn’t seem like it fits the TechCrunch mould. It says a lot about knowing your audience.