Storage Limits on WordPress.com

I subscribe to the WordPress FAQ Page. I was doing some catch up tonight, reading stuff that normally I don’t get time to do and came across a post that was made at the week-end and it has caused me to rethink the way I do things.

The reason that I get behind in both blogging and reading feeds that I want to read by the end of the week is my other passion. Podcasting. I get bummed if I have not done some blogging done by Thursday because that usually means that it won’t happen until the following week. I am finalising the show notes for The Global Geek Podcast, sourcing music and everything else that goes into the pre and post production. Something has to, usually my personal blog. But I don’t worry too much as I am still blogging in another way, it just does not feel the same. Especially since I try to keep the two separate, I want people to know that I have different things to say to a focused reader/listener base. It is a hard juggling act.

So I was catching up and I saw that there was an FAQ Post called “Upload Space“. I thought… upload space…, isn’t that; sort of unlimited? Realising that I had made an assumption! But then I thought about it and guessed that some people upload huge images and whatever else they might like to and that unlimited would not be practical at all. So I found out that:

“Images and other files are currently limited to 50MB in total.”

When you consider that a blog is a long term project that may well cover years, I don’t think that it would be that hard to fill it. Even if you optimise your images and change the resolution or even use them infrequently. So I thought about what I do and I guessed that it might just be possible for me to eventually use 50MB.

The suggestions made in the post are the usual suspects: Flickr, photobucket and box.net. So I am going to start using my Flickr page for images such as pictures and stuff like that (because you should never, never “leach” another sites content!). But I thought I might use omnidrive that I previously talked about for logos and screenshots or box.net. Although both the latter have a 1GIG limit, for what I do I am going to be hard pushed to fill it. Then again even if the flickr account looks like going close to the bandwidth limit the cost of a pro account (per year) is less than storage at omnidrive or box.net. So I’ll admit, not sure exactly what I am going to do. I like the downloadable applications that the storage services offer but I like the price of Flickr ($24.95USD p.a) and it is unlimited.

The thing that you have to remember is that while a post for you might be ancient history, the page may well be still viewed and appreciated by your readers. If you want them to look the same way that they did when you posted it then you need to look at the ongoing storage of images and pictures that you used in the post. This hosting requirement will grow as time goes on and the number of posts increases. This then means that your bandwidth need increases. How much? That depends what you post and your reliance on images. Food for thought as you may well be thinking about these things as well.

What solutions are other WordPress.com users doing? If anything.

Box.net

Flickr

photobucket

Omnidrive to Launch in a Few Hours

Omnidrive LogoJust noticed that the Australian Company Omnidrive is about to move out of private beta and go live. The service has attracted a lot of attention over the last couple of months and being an Aussie myself I am proud to give it a mention here.

Omnidrive is an on-line storage solution that offers a free 1Gig account with more storage available for a fee. 10Gig will cost you 40 bucks a year, not bad. Larger storage is available on application for what is described as a reasonable price. The latest on the company blog says:

“… give us a bit more time and we should have the sign up link there for you in a few hours, we will keep you posted on the blog here.”

Nothing so far, but the word is that at 0001hrs PST the site will go live.

The service offers a web interface as you would expect and also a client that will be available as a drive on your system. Correct, right along side “My Computer” (cool eh.). This sounds exciting. Seamless integration with your operating system. There is a client for Mac as well. The uploading and downloading of files works in the background and you can control the bandwidth so that your system resources are free to do what you need to do effectively.

All your data that is stored on Omnidrive is encrypted and safe. However, there is the ability to share your stored content in the space of two clicks of the mouse with anyone you choose.

There has been a lot of buzz recently about on-line storage solutions with the launch of services such as MediaFire, box.net, and Badongo. Omnidrive is the latest in a series of products that offer a similar service. There are a few things that set Omnidrive apart. However, this space looks like one that is going to be very hot over the next twelve months as the best of them float to the top. Expect to see some very competitive pricing and expanding services and feature sets. Competition is what will make the best of these services attractive and effective solutions. Watch this space.

Michael Arrington of TechCrunch describes the service as:

“a product that I and millions of others really need… as good or better than anything else I’ve seen out of silicon valley recently. It has been in development for 12 months.”

High praise and I look forward to giving the service a spin myself. Perhaps you are looking for a superior online storage solution and might want to try it, looks like you could do a lot worse than Omnidrive. Plus the logo is cool.

Storage Mash-Up